HS2 in Hansard 12/06/2014

High Speed 2 Railway Line

Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport (1) with reference to the answer of 31 March
2014, Official Report, column 408W, on High Speed 2
Railway Line, what the evidential basis is for the
expense and disruption caused by double-decker
carriages being greater than that caused by High
Speed 2; [199296]
(2) with reference to the answer of 31 March 2014,
Official Report, columns 408-9W, on High Speed 2
railway line, whether his Department has subsequently
compared double-decking with revised estimates of the
costs and effects of High Speed 2; [199261]
(3) with reference to the answer of 31 March 2014,
Official Report, column 408W, on High Speed 2
Railway Line, what the evidential basis for doubledecker
carriages not releasing sufficient capacity for
commuter services is. [199298]
Mr Goodwill: As per the answer of 31 March 2014,
since 2009 we have considered a wide range of alternative
options to a high speed railway including the use of
alternative modes, a conventional speed line and upgrades
to the existing rail network, including double decking.
Specifically, the March 2010 High Speed 2 Strategic
Alternatives Study considered the potential for using
double deck trains onWCMLas one means of enhancing
capacity on conventional rail routes between London
and the West Midlands/North West. Details of this
study, including evidence of expense, disruption and
capacity, can be found at:
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http:/www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/rail/pi/highspeedrail/alternativestudy/pdf/railintervention.pdf

This work found that while double deck carriages
could increase the number of passengers per train there
is a practical limit to the expansion of capacity in this
manner and it offers limited potential to lead to journey
time savings.
This option is also likely to lead to significant disruption
and expense. Before such trains could be used on the
West Coast Mainline, the route (including diversionary
routes) would need to be gauge cleared to allow sufficient
space for the trains to operate. This would involve
raising all overhead wires, raising bridges, modifying
platforms on the route, modifying station canopies,
moving or raising all signal gantries and other signage
on the route, and lowering track in the tunnels. Work
would need to be carried out to modify existing depots
or to provide new ones. Additional works would also be
required to enable line speeds to be maintained on the
route.
For these reasons it was concluded that there was a
strong case for not considering this option further. No
subsequent work has therefore been done to compare it
to the case for HS2.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport with reference to the answer of 31 March
2014, Official Report, column 408W, on High Speed 2
Railway Line, what the evidential basis is for the
practical limit to the expansion of capacity on theWest
Coast Mainline being lower than predicted growth for
that line. [199297]
Mr Goodwill: Evidence set out in the Strategic Case
demonstrates that parts of the West Coast Main Line
are effectively full in terms of the number of trains;
many of which are already full to overflowing at certain
times of day and demand is expected to grow.
Rail demand has grown by 54% over the last decade,
which is the equivalent of annual growth rate of 4.4%.
Chapter 3 of the Strategic case sets out that even with
more modest growth of 2.5%, all of the additional peak
seats provided by enhancing the line will be used up
during the 2020s.
The Department has considered a wide range of
alternatives including upgrades to the existing West
Coast Main Line. The most recent report, commissioned
from Atkins can be found here:
This provides evidence that expanding capacity on the
West Coast Main line would not be a robust long term
solution to the capacity, connectivity and reliability
challenges on the line. Not only would it not provide
sufficient additional capacity to meet long termdemand,
but it would not offer a robust solution to the problem
of poor service performance and would significantly
disrupt services for many years during construction
work.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport how he expects High Speed 2 to reduce
overcrowding at London Waterloo. [199332]
Mr Goodwill: High Speed 2 is not intended to reduce
overcrowding at LondonWaterloo, as it has been designed
as a link between London Euston, Birmingham, Leeds
and Manchester.
The 2012 Rail Investment Strategy (HLOS) has asked
the industry to provide additional peak capacity for
9,700 extra passengers into Waterloo by 2019 and has
provided funding for Network Rail to expandWaterloo
and other stations. Network Rail and SouthWest Trains
have set out plans to lengthen peak trains and South
West Trains is now in discussions with the Department
for Transport.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport what estimate he has made of the excess
capacity on peak High Speed 2 services. [199333]
Mr Goodwill: The HS2 Economic Case published in
October 2013 indicates that the average all-day load
factor for HS2 services in 2036 for the full network is
expected to be 41%. Peak period load factors are expected
to be significantly higher.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport if he will publish an updated cost benefit
297W Written Answers 12 JUNE 2014 Written Answers 298W
analysis for High Speed 2 in light of the decision not to
link High Speed 2 with High Speed 1 and Eurostar
services. [199334]
Mr Goodwill: We will continue to revise and update
the economic case for HS2 as new project milestones
are reached, such as decisions on the preferred route for
Phase 2, to ensure it is based on the best available
evidence and latest understanding of the project, including
taking account of the decision to remove the existing
proposals for the HS1-HS2 link from the scheme.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport how High Speed 2 improve reliability and
reduce overcrowding on regional links between towns
and cities in the North West. [199339]
Mr Goodwill: By moving long distance passengers off
the existing network, HS2 will release capacity for more
regional services, reducing overcrowding and improving
reliability, as well as improving connectivity. Nationally,
the Economic Case for HS2 found that HS2 will deliver
reliability benefitsworth £5.5 billion, and reduced crowding
benefits of £7.5 billion,which includes benefits to regional
services in the North West.
In response to recommendations made by Sir David
Higgins, HS2 Ltd and Network Rail have been
commissioned to consider what further improvements
can be made to centre to city centre connectivity, east-west
links and local connectivity in the Midlands and the
North, with a final report on options in 2015.
Mr O’Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport what estimate he has made of the number of
people who will move home as a result of the
construction of High Speed 2 because of (a)
demolition for construction of the line and (b) blight.
[199340]
Stephen Hammond: There are 464 dwellings within
the area currently subject to surface-level safeguarding
for the London to West Midlands section of HS2, of
which 339 are to be demolished. Given recent Census
data showing an average 2.3 occupants per property in
the UK, we expect around 1,000 people will move from
those homes.
We have not estimated numbers of people who may
move for reasons of generalised property blight, but
there are approximately 220 dwellings within theVoluntary
Purchase Area for the London toWest Midlands Route
announced on 9 April. Our aim is where possible to
avoid serious impacts on local residents and enable
people to remain in their homes. We expect to consult
shortly on further measures that may make that choice
more attractive for homeowners.
Pending future decisions on routes and designs, we
have made no similar estimates for other proposed
sections of HS2.
Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport if he will publish a list of properties that
have been valued by Carter Jonas under the
Exceptional Hardship Scheme for High Speed 2; and
whether those valuations have been accepted or queried
by the owners of those properties. [199640]
Mr Goodwill: To provide the full information as
requested would risk compromising the privacy of the
applicants.Thefollowing anonymisedsummaryinformation
may be helpful:
For Phase One:
Carter Jonas has valued a total of 47 properties.
4 of those valuations have been queried by applicants.
Carter Jonas valuations have been used to form the offer price
a total of 41 times and 35 of these offers have been accepted.
For Phase Two:
Carter Jonas has valued a total of 22 properties.
None of those valuations have been queried by applicants.
Carter Jonas valuations have been used to form the offer price
a total of 20 times and all of these offers have been accepted.
Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport if he will publish details of the recruitment
of the Independent Residents Commissioner promised
by HS2 Ltd in the April 2014 HS2 Residents
Charter, including (a) where this position is advertised,
(b) the remuneration package offered, (c) the
interview process and the interview panel members, (d)
the estimated date of any appointments, (e)
the Commissioner’s powers and (f) how the
Commissioner’s independence will be assured. [199643]
Mr Goodwill: Details of the Independent Residents
Commissioner andResidents’ Charter forHS2are currently
being developed and further information will be published
in due course.
Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport how many people have accessed the HS2 Ltd
complaints procedure set out in the HS2 Residents’
Charter of April 2014; what the details are of each
complaint; what the outcome is of each complaint; and
what complaints are outstanding. [199644]
Mr Goodwill: The complaints procedure, along with
other aspects of the Residents’ Charter for HS2, is
currently being developed and further information will
be published in due course.
Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport what the average time taken to respond by
HS2 Ltd to property related compensation enquiries is;
and what the longest time taken to respond to such an
enquiry has been. [199645]
Mr Goodwill: HS2 Ltd aims to respond to all inquiries
as soon as possible and within a maximum of 20
working days.
Performance against this standard was 93% for April
2013 to March 2014.
Ahigh proportion of these inquiries relate to property
compensation but HS2 Ltd does not compile separate
performance data for different inquiry types.
Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for
Transport how much his Department has paid to
Carter Jonas for work in connection with High Speed 2
to date; and what those payments were for. [199666]
Mr Goodwill: £86,851.07 (including VAT) has been
paid to Carter Jonas by HS2 Ltd, from 2009 to May
2014.
299W Written Answers 12 JUNE 2014 Written Answers 300W
These payments relate to the following activities:
attending property consultations in the capacity of property
experts
providing valuations of properties
attending properties on the day of completion to facilitate
handover
acting on behalf of clients in receipt of payments regarding
HS2 Ltd access to land and environmental surveys
completing client Land Interest Questionnaires
undertaking Farm Impact Assessments

 

HS2 was also mentioned throughout:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmhansrd/chan6.pdf

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