HS2 in Hansard 15/01/2014

High Speed 2 Railway Line

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will publish an updated version of the KPMG report on HS2 regional economic impacts, addressing the question of whether there will be slower journey times and less frequent services between those towns and cities which will be reliant on the classic rail network following the completion of HS2; and if he will make a statement. [182263]

Mr Goodwill: The analysis presented in the September 2013 report “Regional Economic Impacts of HS2” undertaken by KPMG on behalf of HS2 Ltd is based on the train service specifications for both HS2 and the classic rail network used to inform the August 2012 Economic Case for HS2, which was the most up to date information at the time the analysis was undertaken. These train service specifications have been created for modelling and appraisal purposes only and do not represent a commitment to any specific service pattern. TheDepartment will continue to develop its understanding of the best use of the rail network with HS2 and the implications of different options for the costs of operating the rail network.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the cost-benefit calculations for High Speed 2 will continue to assume a reduction in the cost of operating the classic rail network after the HS2 route is completed; what total annual saving is assumed; what specific reductions in services and frequencies are proposed; and if he will make a statement. [182264]

Mr Goodwill: We will continue to keep all assumptions made in the economic case for HS2 under review to ensure decisions are based on the best available evidence. The latest economic case published in October 2013 assumes that when HS2 opens fast intercity services to Birmingham and points north will be migrated to the new high speed network, with offsetting reductions in intercity services on the classic rail network. Descriptions of the assumed service offerings were set out in ‘PfM v4.3: Assumptions report’, published in October 2013 alongside the Economic Case. A copy has been placed in the House Library. These assumptions have been created for modelling and appraisal purposes only and do not represent a commitment to any specific service pattern. The Department will continue to develop its understanding of the best use of the rail network with HS2 and the implications of different options for the costs of operating the rail network. The estimated annual saving assumed in the economic case for HS2 is £447 million in 2033-34 (in real 2011 prices, undiscounted).

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will publish an updated version of the KPMG report on High Speed Rail 2 Regional Economic Impacts to include the disbenefits identified by KPMG for those regions not served by HS2; and if he will make a statement. [182265]

Mr Goodwill: The analysis presented in the September 2013 report “Regional Economic Impacts of HS2” undertaken by KPMG on behalf of HS2 Ltd identified the impact on productivity for all areas across Great Britain, including those not served by HS2. The findings presented in the September 2013 report show the net impact on productivity—that is the sum of total gains in productivity minus any losses. Of course HS2 doesn’t serve all areas and the KPMG figures reflect that. The benefits are naturally greater in the places the line serves directly. This analysis does not include the benefits of other investments to boost the transport system. This Government will invest £73 billion in the next parliament, of which £17 billion will be spent on HS2, and this will help places not being served by HS2.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether stopping services on the West Coast Main Line will be reduced following the completion of the HS2 route; and if he will make a statement. [182266]

Mr Goodwill: The introduction of HS2 services will deliver a huge improvement to passengers who currently use the West Coast Main Line when the Phase 1 route opens in 2026. In addition HS2 introduction will enable existing train service to be reconfigured to provide improvements to many inter-regional and commuter services. The Department shortly intends to launch an open and consultative process to help develop and refine the work to plan GB rail services as a whole following the opening of HS2. Any changes to service patterns on existing lines will be subject to consultation during the development of future franchise propositions. The Department, in its role as Franchising Authority, 553W Written Answers 15 JANUARY 2014 Written Answers 554W will be clearly focused on ensuring that rail services work as a whole, at network level to offer best value for passengers and taxpayers.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the effect of line closures on the classic rail network as a result of the construction of HS2; and if he will make a statement. [182267]

Mr Goodwill: HS2 Ltd have estimated that around 386 weekend closures of parts of the existing rail network will be necessary as a result of the construction works for the full HS2 Y network (Phase 1 and Phase 2). HS2 Ltd have advised that the closures will be a mix of partial and full closures, although in most cases some rail services will be able to operate on the affected lines albeit with some service restrictions. In addition it will be necessary to utilise somemidweek night time closures, although wherever possible these will combined with planned renewals activities. In comparison, Network Rail have estimated that around 2,790 weekend closures of parts of the rail network would be required if rail alternatives to the full HS2 Y network were adopted in its place.

Mr Andrew Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what further plans he has for public consultation on the use of theWashwood Heath site by High Speed 2. [182442]

Mr Goodwill: In addition to the consultations already carried out by the Department for Transport prior to deposit of the High Speed Rail (London-West Midlands Bill), there is now a period of public consultation on the Environmental Statement for the proposed scheme that closes on 24 January. There are no other plans for public consultation on the proposed London-West Midlands route.

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the potential effect of closures on the road network as a result of the construction of High Speed 2; and if he will make a statement. [182545]

Mr Goodwill: The traffic and transport impacts of all proposed temporary and permanent road and public right of way closures and associated diversions have been assessed in the Transport Assessment in Volume 5 of the Environmental Statement (ES) for the most likely scenarios. The resultant environmental effects are also included within the ES for each Community Forum Area (Volume 2 reports).

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations he has received from (a) the China Railway Group, (b) Birmingham City Council and (c) Birmingham Airport on investment in links to High Speed 2 infrastructure. [182628]

Mr Goodwill: Sir Albert Bore, Leader of Birmingham City Council, wrote to the Secretary of State forTransport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Derbyshire Dales (Mr McLoughlin), on 20 December 2013, seeking his support for facilitating a meeting between HS2 Ltd and CSR Corporation Limited, a Chinese rolling stock company. SirAlbert’s letter refers directly to the possibility of Chinese investment in HS2, though not to any specific project or link to HS2. There have so far been no direct approaches from either Birmingham City airport or ChinaRailwayGroup relating to investment in links to HS2 infrastructure.

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether passport control services will operate in Manchester and Leeds under current plans for High Speed 2; [182734] (2) whether passengers from Birmingham will (a) have the facility to clear customs at Curzon Street or (b) be required to change trains at Old Oak Common to clear customs under current plans for High Speed 2. [182735]

Mr Goodwill: Arrangements for passport control and customs services, including whether passengers would be required to change trains at Old Oak Common, will depend on the Home Office requirements in place at the time services are in operation. These will be developed in co-ordination with the HomeOffice during the detailed design process. The designs of Old Oak Common and Birmingham Curzon Street stations allow space for customs facilities to be provided, based on those utilised by Eurostar at Ebbsfleet and St Pancras. We are currently consulting on the Phase Two route and station options and detailed design work of the stations at Manchester and Leeds will be undertaken after the planned route has been announced.

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmhansrd/chan104.pdf

Advertisements